You are currently browsing the monthly archive for May 2013.

hlp2015-logoThe CSW58 priority theme is “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls,” and while you can find more basic information on the MDGs here and a summary of the post-2015 dialogue here, we want to remind you that the High Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda is releasing their major report today at 15:00 EDT.

At 15:00 EDT you can view the report and executive summary on the High Level Panel’s website.  At that time you can also watch a webcast of the closed member states event that’s taking place this morning at http://webtv.un.org.

Additionally, The World We Want platform will launch a page dedicated to the report’s release which can be found at: www.worldwewant2015.org/HLPREPORT.  On that page you’ll be able to find the following:

  • Newly launched visualizations of all inputs to the World We Want platform
  • MyWorld trends and outcomes
  • Analysis of #post2015 Twitter conversation carried out by UN Global Pulse
  • The 86 statements and letters formally submitted to the Post2015HLP by civil society organizations

There will also be a webcast stakeholder event tomorrow, 31 May at 10:00 EDT, moderated by Femi Oke, that you can watch at http://webtv.un.org.

Be sure to continue following the conversation by using #Post2015HLP, @WorldWeWant2015, @unngls, @2015on and @myworld2015.

Finally, if you’re interested in further spreading the word about the High Level Panel report and the post-2015 dialogue, you can find a social media pack from the World We Want here.

Countries around the world are marking the first International Day to End Obstetric Fistula today, 23 May 2013, in an effort to raise support and awareness of a devastating injury that can occur during childbirth.  For more information check out the Campaign to End Fistula and watch a short video from UN TV here.

As the CSW58 priority theme is “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls,” Ecumenical Women is focusing over the next few months on educating our online community about the MDGs and the ongoing “post-2015 dialogue” on what will follow their completion.

While you can find more basic information on the MDGs here and a summary of the post-2015 dialogue here, we did want to provide two specific updates on what is happening within the UN system this week:

Who Will Be Accountable?: Human Rights and the Post-2015 Development Agenda
Earlier today the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights released a new publication discussing accountability toward ensuring human rights in the post-2015 development agenda.  As stated in the publication’s foreword:

“…some of the most celebrated Millennium Development Goals success stories since 2000 are now sites of mass protest decrying widespread deprivation, repression and inequalities masked by the narrow models of economic analysis that have characterized development approaches in the pre-2015 period. The message is clear: economic growth is not an adequate measure of development. Rather, equality matters, the environment matters and human rights matter. So do good governance and anti-corruption. The real test, to a growing global population demanding a life of dignity, is the degree to which they are able to enjoy freedom from fear and want, without discrimination.

If you’re interested in learning more about the proposed “human rights approach” to global development instead of the primarily economic approach of the MDGs, be sure to check out the publication here.

Open Working Group on the Sustainable Development Goals
The third session of the Open Working Group on the Sustainable Development Goals opened today at UN headquarters in New York and will continue until this Friday, 24 May.  This afternoon’s subject is “Food Security & Nutrition, Sustainable Agriculture, Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought,” and the importance of educating women farmers on sustainable agriculture practice was just mentioned, for example.  You can watch a live webcast of the proceedings here.  The Open Working Group on the SDGs is a main aspect of the post-2015 dialogue.

The-route-to-2015-and-beyondAs the CSW58 priority theme is “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls,” Ecumenical Women is focusing over the next few months on educating our online community about the MDGs and ongoing dialogue about what will follow their completion.

While our previous post summarized the many different facets and timelines of post-2015, a discussion of how the dialogue has progressed thus far is also important.  In that regard, we hope you find the following three resources from diverse perspectives helpful:

  • Crowdsourcing the next development agenda,” by Olav Kjørven, UN assistant secretary-general and director of bureau for development policy at UN development programme (UNDP).  This piece, published in The Guardian on 9 May  discusses the use of new communication technologies to increase global participation in the post-2015 dialogue.

Finally, this extremely helpful resource publish by UNDP on 20 March provides preliminary analysis on learning from the dialogue: “The Global Conversation Begins.”

We hope you found this post helpful, and be sure to check back at Ecumenical Women frequently for resources on how each of the eight Millennium Development Goals relate to women and girls.

As the CSW58 priority theme is “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls,” Ecumenical Women is focusing over the next few months on educating our online community about the MDGs and ongoing dialogue about what will follow their completion.

If you don’t know much about the MDGs or even what they are, that’s okay! To read a recent EW post on the basics, click here. While we’ll be going into each of the eight MDGs (and specifically how they relate to women and girls) soon, a dialogue on figuring out what will replace the MDGs in 2015, currently termed “the post-2015 development agenda,” is already well underway, and you can participate in it! Thus, we thought some information about how the dialogue has unfolded so far, and how you can get involved, might be helpful.

There are currently a number of separate processes providing input into the post-2015 dialogue, and luckily the UN Foundation and Dalberg Analysis have mapped it out in the infographic below (click to enlarge):

Post2015 Timeline

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Open Working Group was set-up this past January in response to recommendations from Rio+20, a United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012. While the working group is due to present its final recommendations to the UN General Assembly in September 2014, a draft report was released and opened for comments on 7 May, 2013. To read the draft report, click here. It remains to be seen however, if the SDGs will end up representing an entirely separate set of goals or will directly feed into the post-2015 development agenda.

The UN-led Process has a number of different moving parts. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon announced the creation of a High Level Panel to advise on post-2015 development agenda. The panel is co-chaired by President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono of Indonesia; President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia and Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom. After holding meetings in each of co-chairs’ respective countries (as well as brief meeting at the 2012 General Assembly), the panel is scheduled to release its report at the end of May.

The UN, in conjunction with civil-society and other international organizations, is additionally leading 88 consultations in specific countries and 11 consultations on the following themes:

And here’s where we as Ecumenical Women can lend our voice. All the links above will send you to specific consultation areas on the World We Want 2015, a web-platform created by the UN and civil-society to gather the priorities of people from every corner of the world.

If you’d prefer to provide more general input, you can create a profile and then answer questions like “World leaders are creating new development goals. What needs to be included?” on the World We Want 2015.

If you’d prefer to begin contributing through a basic survey, you can vote on your top priorities for development in the MY World survey.

There are also a number of non-UN activities feeding into the post-2015 dialogue. Beyond 2015, for instance, is a global civil society campaign that brings together more than 620 organizations.

So wow- that’s a lot of information, but we hope you found it helpful. Be sure to participate in the World We Want, the MY World survey and please leave us a comment if you have any questions or concerns.

Finally, if you’re interested in a more detailed timeline of the post-2015 dialogue, the Guardian has created a great resource that you can find here.

MDG8CSW58′s priority theme will be “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls,” and with that priority theme in mind, Ecumenical Women will focus over the next few months on educating our online community about the MDGs and current conversations around what will follow their completion in a post-2015 development agenda.

As April 5th marked the 1,000-day milestone until the 2015 target date to achieve the MDGs, faith leaders from around the world (including some representing EW member organizations), released the following statement urging Heads of Government to fulfill existing commitments to spend 0.7% of national income on aid (related to MDG 8), among other actions.  For news coverage and a full list of signatories, click here.

Dear Sir, 

Today marks the start of the 1000 day countdown to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the 2015 deadline. It is an appropriate moment to pause and to reflect on progress to date.  Development is working. But challenges remain. The number of people living in extreme poverty has been halved ahead of time and 14,000 fewer children die each day than in 1990. Yet 1 in 8 people still go to bed hungry every night and over 2 million die of malnutrition each year.  Even as conversations accelerate as to what ought to replace the MDGs, we should not slacken our efforts towards realising existing goals. Meeting the remaining targets, while challenging, is possible – but only if governments do not waiver from the moral and political commitments made over a decade ago. 

Thirteen years on from the start of the Millennium the values and principles that drive these goals are as imperative as ever. The financial crisis may be a reason but is not an excuse for hesitation or deferral. The MDGs remind us that in addition to providing for the well being of our own societies, we have a collective responsibility to uphold human dignity and the common good at the global level. Each individual has a value that can never be lost and must never be ignored. 

With a focus on tax, trade and transparency, the UK Presidency of the G8 this year has the potential to advance the MDG agenda in ways that strike at the underlying causes of poverty, in particular by ensuring the wealth created by developing countries is not lost through unfair tax practices, a lack of transparency or a failure to secure the benefits of trade for developing countries. 

As religious leaders from across the G8 we recommend that our Heads of Government take the following actions when they meet in June. First, fulfill existing commitments to spend 0.7% of national income on aid. Secondly, launch a G8 Convention on Tax Transparency committing signatory countries to prevent individuals and companies from hiding wealth so that it’s untraceable. Thirdly, press for greater financial transparency from governments of developing countries so that the citizens of these countries can hold their governments to account for the money they spend. Reaching a purposeful consensus on these areas won’t be easy. But, if the political will and moral leadership is forthcoming, this year’s G8 could help to create an environment that encourages the conditions for inclusive, equitable and sustainable economic growth – conditions that are desperately needed if we are to realise the MDGs and even greater things beyond.

With this year’s Commission on the Status of Women over and its Agreed Conclusions (in English) now finalized, Ecumenical Women is beginning to prepare for next year’s commission, CSW58.  Although it is only in its initial planning stages, we do know that CSW58’s  priority theme will be “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and girls.”  With that priority theme in mind, Ecumenical Women will focus over the next few months on educating our online community about the MDGs and current conversations around what will follow their completion in a  post-2015 development agenda.

While there is a lot out there on the MDGs and the post-2015 development agenda, the following resources should provide you with a basic entry point for learning more about the topic.  Be sure to check back here on our site frequently for videos, graphics, reports and other resources that discuss the MDGs and the post-2015 development agenda in more detail, particularly how they relate to women and girls.

An introductory video on the MDGs and how they were formed:

 

As April 5th, 2013 marked the 1,000-day milestone until the 2015 target date to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the UN has launched the #MDGmomentum campaign.  For more info, click on the following infographic (and then share it with others on social media):

MDGs-1000-days (1)

And finally, here are a few additional links to great resources on the MDGs and the post-2015 development agenda.  Some of these will be explored further in future posts:

Twitter Timeline

RSS UN Gender Equality Newsfeed

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    The work of a gynaecologist who treats rape victims who have been subjected to sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the focus of a film which has just been released. "The Man Who Mends Women", tells the story of Dr Denis Mukwege.
    UN Radio
  • Report lays out "baseline" for progress in gender equality
    Although women are outpacing men in achieving higher levels of education, they are still more likely to pursue the humanities as opposed to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. That's according to the World's Women 2015, a UN report which looks at how women worldwide are faring in eight critical areas such as health, education, work, p […]
    UN Radio

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