Written by: Mavis Duncanson, Presbyterian Women Aotearoa New Zealand

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I was privileged to be able to observe and listen to this high-level event which was organised by the OECD Development Assistance Committee Network on Gender Equality, and the Missions of Switzerland, France, Peru, Morocco, Italy and Fiji in partnership with others. At the very start we were reminded that this conversation could not be more timely nor more urgent, especially in light of the recent catastrophic damage experienced by the people of Fiji.  Although women and girls are disproportionately affected by climate change and are also drivers of effective action, an OECD review in 2013 found that gender equality was targeted in only 29% of DAC members’ bilateral aid for climate change action. It is encouraging to learn that private sector funders of climate change action have been very strong in seeking gender equity training, and including gender equity in their proposed projects. I hope this will lead to better results in future OECD audits and that more organisations will follow the example of Green Climate Fund which has mandatory gender analysis in funding applications. The interrelatedness of the SDGs and need for explicit links between CSW60 and COP22 was highlighted in the report from Peru that adolescent girls from rural areas are increasingly subject to sexual violence as El Nino weather patterns badly affect rural areas and changing social patterns increase their exposure to harm. The association between climate change and violence against women and girls is well established and the panel also noted that in Vanuatu there was a 300% increase in sexual violence after Cyclone Pam. Women are at the front line of climate change crisis and solutions, and action must be informed by their experience. With the panel my hope is that women will be right at the heart of the process to translate political commitments into effective gender-responsive climate solutions.